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    "If you've been injured through no fault of your own you could be entitled to compensation. If you're unsure if you could claim, I recommend you call Accident Advice Helpline."

    Esther Rantzen

    Five most dangerous holiday pastimes


    Being on holiday is a time to relax, a time to unwind with friends, family and loved ones. It can also be a time of thrilling adventure, an opportunity to try out new and exciting things. Whatever you do on holiday, it’s likely that health and safety is far from the forefront of your mind. However, depressing as it may sound, it ought not to be.

    Accidents on holiday can bring anyone back down to earth with a considerably painful bump. An epic adventure quickly becomes a waking nightmare from which it can take an awfully long time to recover.

    What am I most likely to suffer an injury on holiday while doing?

    Here are the five most dangerous pursuits to indulge in whilst on holiday.

    One: Scuba-diving

    The underwater world is a magical kingdom. A kaleidoscope of colour and all manner of weird and wonderful creatures live below the surface of the waves and seeing them up close and personal can be an unforgettable experience.

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    Sadly, it can also be a dangerous one. From threatening creatures of the deep to equipment malfunctions or simply getting lost, the list of potential holiday accidents from scuba diving is both long and serious.

    Two: Riding motorcycles

    Another classic staple of the holiday diet is the epic road trip. Touring a country on two wheels is one of the best ways of seeing everything an area has to offer. However, it can also result in serious injuries with lengthy recovery times.

    Road traffic accidents are usually serious and motorcycle accidents even more so, given the comparative lack of protection.

    Three: Recreational boating

    Another popular, yet dangerous holiday pastime. Holidaymakers run into problems by overestimating their own ability and taking on too much, too soon in terms of depth and distance. Far too many also neglect to wear a life-jacket which makes a holiday accident all the more serious.

    Four: Mountain climbing

    Another activity where equipment and ability are vital to avoiding holiday injuries. It’s always best to go in large groups, preferably with a guard.

    Five: Hang-gliding

    The Health and Safety Executive states that the risk of death in a hang-gliding accident is 1 out of every 116,000 flights. When things go wrong in the air, the consequences tend to be serious.

    If you suffer an injury on holiday, Accident Advice Helpline can help you establish whether or not you have a case for holiday accident compensation.

    Date Published: September 4, 2013

    Author: David Brown

    Category: Holiday accident claims

    Accident Advice Helpline (or AAH) is a trading style of Slater Gordon Solutions Legal Limited. Slater Gordon Solutions Legal Limited is a company registered in England and Wales with registration number 07931918, VAT 142 8192 16, registered office Dempster Building, Atlantic Way, Brunswick Business Park, Liverpool, L3 4UU and is an approved Alternative Business Structure authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

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