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    "If you've been injured through no fault of your own you could be entitled to compensation. If you're unsure if you could claim, I recommend you call Accident Advice Helpline."

    Esther Rantzen

    Top 3 dangers of participating in triathlons


    There are few pursuits as physically and mentally demanding as a triathlon. If you’re training to compete in a triathlon for charity or you’re keen to test your mettle and push your body to the limits, the last thing you want is an injury stopping you reaching your goals.

    Top 3 dangers of participating in triathlons

    Here are some of the dangers of participating in triathlons and some top tips to help you steer clear of injury and stay safe on the roads, tracks and waterways.

    Exhaustion

    A triathlon is no walk in the park. If you thought it was hard enough to swim endless lengths, ride a bike for a few miles or go for a jog around the park, imagine the physical pain of combining all these pursuits. When you embark on triathlon training, you’re going to put your body through its paces, and really push it to the limit. Even if you have a high level of fitness, exhaustion is one of the main dangers of participating in triathlons. Sometimes, no matter how fit and strong you are, your body cannot cope with anything else you try and throw at it, and you hit a wall. To prevent exhaustion, make sure you fuel your body correctly, stay hydrated, and give yourself rest days between training sessions.

    Negotiating the terrain

    In most cases, when you compete in a triathlon, you’ll be asked to try and navigate your way through a course which boasts tricky terrain. Whether you’re trying to cycle along a rocky mountain road or you’re attempting to run up the side of a steep hill, there’s a high risk of triathlon injuries. You can easily lose your footing and trip while running or turn your ankle on cobbled streets. When you’re cycling, it’s easy to come off the bike if you hit a stone in the road or find yourself losing your balance when the terrain is uneven. When you’re running, make sure you have sturdy, comfortable footwear, and look where you’re going. Take care to avoid getting too close to other riders when on the bike.

    Other athletes

    You may think that the physical challenge is your greatest hurdle, but other competitors can also make life difficult. If you’ve been injured by a fellow triathlon participant, and you weren’t at fault, you may be thinking about claiming compensation.

    Open Claim Calculator

    If you’ve been injured while competing in a triathlon and you’d like to find out more about making a no-win, no-fee* claim for a triathlon accident, call Accident Advice Helpline now on 0800 689 0500 or 0333 500 0993 from a mobile phone.

    Date Published: April 18, 2017

    Author: Accident Advice

    Accident Advice Helpline (or AAH) is a trading style of Slater Gordon Solutions Legal Limited. Slater Gordon Solutions Legal Limited is a company registered in England and Wales with registration number 07931918, VAT 142 8192 16, registered office Dempster Building, Atlantic Way, Brunswick Business Park, Liverpool, L3 4UU and is an approved Alternative Business Structure authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

    Disclaimer: This website contains content contributed by third parties, therefore any opinions, comments or other information expressed on this site that do not relate to the business of AAHDL or its associated companies should be understood as neither being held or endorsed by this business.

    No-Win No-Fee: *Subject to insurance costs. Fee payable if case not pursued at client's request.