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    "If you've been injured through no fault of your own you could be entitled to compensation. If you're unsure if you could claim, I recommend you call Accident Advice Helpline."

    Esther Rantzen

    Health and Safety News

    Road safety education should be compulsory in schools according to charity

    By David Brown on February 6, 2015

    The Institute of Advanced Motorists is calling for road safety education to be made compulsory in schools. According to a recent survey there are only eight countries across Europe that teach this topic as a standard subject.

    The director of Policy and Research at the Institute of Advanced Motorists, Neil Greig, has stated that young people won’t automatically think about it unless it is included as a key part of the curriculum. In addition educators will have no requirement to teach it unless it is part of the curriculum. Only Italy, Latvia and Germany have any kind of requirement for road safety education to be taught to young people. Poland also teaches its youngsters the proper rules applying to pedestrians as well as to cyclists and those riding mopeds at two stages – when they are seven and additionally when they are fifteen.

    Mr Greig has pointed out the targets the government has set on reducing the number of fatalities and injuries to young people on Britain’s roads. He believes that supporting road safety education through the national curriculum can help contribute to further success in this area.

    Should this topic be part of the national curriculum?

    Opinions on this are divided, but clearly there is a need to ensure all young people are made aware of the potential dangers involved with being a pedestrian, a cyclist and a road user at all stages of their lives. By starting these teachings at an early age, young children may potentially be much safer than they would otherwise be. While the vast majority of parents will teach their children how to stay safe on the roads, additional compulsory teaching at school may also have a significant effect in the future.

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    Source: Road Safety Support

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    Date Published: February 6, 2015

    Author: David Brown

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