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    "If you've been injured through no fault of your own you could be entitled to compensation. If you're unsure if you could claim, I recommend you call Accident Advice Helpline."

    Esther Rantzen

    Clay pigeon shooting injury advice


    Clay pigeon shooting injury advice

    The first clay pigeon shoot took place in the late 19th century, and today there are at least 20 different types of regulated clay pigeon competitions, or disciplines. Not just a sport for those who live in the countryside, clay pigeon shooting is as popular with women as it is with men, and most shooting takes place at club shooting grounds. Special launchers fire clays into the area, simulating the flight patterns of wild quarry – it’s a tricky sport made more difficult by the recoil of the shotguns used, which can take some getting used to for beginners. As with any sport, there are risks involved in clay pigeon shooting, most of which are associated with using a gun. But if you have been injured in an accident that wasn’t your fault and you need clay pigeon shooting injury advice, Accident Advice Helpline can help you out.

    What are the main risks of clay pigeon shooting?

    With over 1.2 million people in the UK picking up a gun on a regular basis, it’s easy to see where the risks of clay pigeon shooting present themselves. The majority of these people use a shotgun for clay pigeon shooting or target shooting at a gun range. It’s important to be aware of the dangers of clay shooting and put safety first at all times when you are shooting. Unfortunately, no matter how careful you are, there will always be those who act negligently, putting others at risk. Rules and regulations at shooting clubs are there to protect you and minimise the risk of accidents whilst you are shooting.

    One possible danger associated with clay pigeon shooting is unsafe discharge of a shotgun. The other main danger is from clay pigeons splintering near you.

    If you are a member of a club then you will normally be surrounded by people that you know and trust when you’re shooting clays, however at larger events you could be in the company of others you don’t know.

    Injured at a clay pigeon event?

    If you have been unlucky enough to be injured at a clay pigeon competition or other event, you might want to seek clay pigeon shooting injury advice, as it could be that the event organisers are held liable for your injuries. For example, if you have been injured due to faulty equipment or poorly-maintained facilities – or even unsafe, defective spectator stands, you could be eligible to claim personal injury compensation.

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    Clay pigeon shooting injury advice

    Obviously the main danger whilst clay pigeon shooting is the fact that you are using a powerful gun, usually a side-by-side shotgun. Ensuring that your gun is clean and well maintained is vital to keep you safe, but even so there have been cases where experienced shooters have been killed due to accidental discharge of their gun. It’s an excellent idea to work with a CPSA instructor who will be able to help you find the right size and type of gun for your height, weight and ability, as the recoil on shotguns can be particularly fierce. Of course you will need to obtain a shotgun certificate from the police to buy or own a shotgun, but these are usually quite simple to get hold of. Maintaining your gun means cleaning and lubricating it after each day of shooting, using specialist products and tools.

    Cutting corners or failing to maintain your gun could increase your risk of being injured in an accident. It’s also important to ensure you visit a specialist gun supplier and spend as much as you can afford on a reputable gun – there have been cases where faulty guns have killed innocent bystanders at shooting ranges.

    Although gun ownership is on the rise in the UK, with 1.8 million guns legally held, gun deaths in 2011 were actually down by 18% on the previous year’s figures, with just 51 deaths. Recent proposals under EU law to ban the use of firearms by under-18s has come under fire from clay pigeon shooting enthusiasts, who believe that training in safe and responsible use of a shotgun at an early age will ensure accidents don’t happen whilst clay pigeon shooting.

    Common clay pigeon shooting injuries

    Seeking clay pigeon shooting injury advice is a good idea if you have been injured in an accident that was somebody else’s fault. For over 16 years, Accident Advice Helpline has helped people to claim compensation for accidents on clay pigeon shooting ranges, and you could be next in line to make a personal injury claim. Here are just a few examples of the types of injuries we have handled claims for over the years:

    • Deafness, usually caused by inadequate or lack of hearing protection
    • Shoulder injuries, from gun recoil
    • Shotgun injuries after being shot by another person
    • Slip, trip and fall injuries
    • Eye and facial injuries and lacerations from clays splintering

    It could be that you have been injured due to negligence on the part of another shooter at your club, or perhaps you’ve been hurt whilst taking part in a competition or event. Whatever has happened, we can help you to get the compensation you’re entitled to.

    Who is to blame for your clay pigeon accident?

    Instructor negligence is the cause of many clay pigeon accidents amongst those just starting out in the sport – for example if your instructor isn’t properly qualified and experienced, they may put you at risk of injury. You could be injured by somebody else accidentally discharging their shotgun whilst it’s pointing in your direction, or by somebody running or rushing whilst carrying a gun. You could suffer injuries caused by faulty equipment at your club, or slip, trip and fall injuries from hazards left lying around. Even if you’re unsure who is at fault, you can get clay pigeon shooting injury advice from a personal injury lawyer, and that’s where Accident Advice Helpline can help. Our team of personal injury advisors offers confidential, no-obligation clay pigeon shooting injury advice that can help you decide what to do next.

    Claiming compensation after a clay pigeon accident

    Whether you need clay pigeon shooting injury advice to help you to decide whether or not to proceed with a claim or you want to talk to somebody about your accident and get the ball rolling on making a claim, you can contact Accident Advice Helpline. It’s free to call our helpline on 0800 689 0500 (or 0333 500 0993 from a mobile, charges may apply) to find out more about making a 100% no-win, no-fee* claim. Whether somebody you love has been seriously injured due to another shooter’s negligence or you yourself have sustained injuries, we can help you to get the compensation you are entitled to.

    Date Published: October 27, 2014

    Author: David Brown

    Accident Advice Helpline (or AAH) is a trading style of Slater Gordon Solutions Legal Limited. Slater Gordon Solutions Legal Limited is a company registered in England and Wales with registration number 07931918, VAT 142 8192 16, registered office Dempster Building, Atlantic Way, Brunswick Business Park, Liverpool, L3 4UU and is an approved Alternative Business Structure authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

    Disclaimer: This website contains content contributed by third parties, therefore any opinions, comments or other information expressed on this site that do not relate to the business of AAHDL or its associated companies should be understood as neither being held or endorsed by this business.

    No-Win No-Fee: *Subject to insurance costs. Fee payable if case not pursued at client's request.