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    "If you've been injured through no fault of your own you could be entitled to compensation. If you're unsure if you could claim, I recommend you call Accident Advice Helpline."

    Esther Rantzen

    Treating extreme sunburn


    Treating extreme sunburn

    Sunburn not only hurts, blisters and peels, it also inflicts wrinkle-inducing damage to your skin. What really makes it a bad idea to get a sunburn, however, is the fact that it significantly increases your chances of developing melanoma, a serious type of skin cancer.

    Treating extreme sunburn

    Sunburn is completely preventable with the help of some common sense; sunscreens, hats, shade and sensible clothing. Mistakes do, however, happen and here is what to do.

    1. Act fast
      The symptoms of sunburn can take up to six hours to fully develop. What may seem like you have just ‘caught a little sun’ could turn out to be a serious problem later. It is therefore, vital to get out of the sun and commence treatment as soon as you begin to feel the first tell-tale reddening and tingling.
    2. Moisturise
      Take a cool bath or shower and then soothe your skin by applying liberal amounts of moisturising lotion or cream to your skin. Consider using a lotion or cream containing vitamins C and E, as they may help to limit the damage to your skin. Hydrocortisone cream may also ease your discomfort for a couple of days. Never break blisters or scrub, peel or pick your skin.
    3. Hydrate
      Burns draw fluid out of the body and towards the skin’s surface. Keep well hydrated by drinking plenty of water, sports drinks or juice for a few days and look out for signs of possible dehydration: thirst, dry mouth, reduced urination, dizziness, sleepiness and/or headaches.

    If you feel ill, consult your doctor.

    Medication

    As soon as you begin to feel and see signs of sunburn, start taking ibuprofen (and keep taking it for 48 hours), as this will help to keep the redness and swelling down.

    Seeking medical help

    While most sunburns can be treated fairly effectively at home, those covering 20 per cent or more of your body or accompanied by chills and fevers require urgent medical attention.

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    Other causes

    Accidents at work leading to exposure to arsenic, creosote or other harmful chemicals may also be the cause of skin cancers. Should you develop a serious skin disease as a result of a work accident, you could be entitled to work injury compensation.

    Get help

    Contact Accident Advice Helpline advisors to get advice concerning work injury claims and assistance in conducting your claim for compensation by experienced in-house legal professionals specialising in industrial illness claims. The no-obligation helpline is confidential and free on 0800 689 0500.

    Date Published: July 22, 2015

    Author: Accident Advice

    Accident Advice Helpline (or AAH) is a trading style of Slater Gordon Solutions Legal Limited. Slater Gordon Solutions Legal Limited is a company registered in England and Wales with registration number 07931918, VAT 142 8192 16, registered office Dempster Building, Atlantic Way, Brunswick Business Park, Liverpool, L3 4UU and is an approved Alternative Business Structure authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

    Disclaimer: This website contains content contributed by third parties, therefore any opinions, comments or other information expressed on this site that do not relate to the business of AAHDL or its associated companies should be understood as neither being held or endorsed by this business.

    No-Win No-Fee: *Subject to insurance costs. Fee payable if case not pursued at client's request.