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    "If you've been injured through no fault of your own you could be entitled to compensation. If you're unsure if you could claim, I recommend you call Accident Advice Helpline."

    Esther Rantzen

    Treating a jellyfish sting


    When it is finally time to embark on your long-awaited summer sojourn, accidents abroad and travel accident compensation really is the last thing on your mind. That being said, sneaky summer sun injuries, such as a jellyfish sting, are always around to bring those dreamy days back down to earth with a thump.

    If you do experience a jellyfish sting during your time abroad, knowing how to treat this holiday ailment can really take the sting out of this holiday dampener.

    What to do if you experience a jellyfish sting

    While setting out to sea for a leisurely swim is a favourite pastime for sun lovers, if you are in the wrong place at the wrong time, you could well find yourself victim of a painful jellyfish sting.

    A jellyfish sting may possibly be one of the most painful holiday incidents you will ever have to endure. In some cases, they can even be fatal if not treated immediately and in the correct way.

    Caring for and treating jellyfish stings can require know-how and speed of thought. While most cases are mild and prove harmless, it is important to know what to do if you or a loved one experience a jellyfish sting.

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    According to the NHS, most people can provide treatment for jellyfish stings without further medical assistance. They recommend that the affected victim and a third party:

    • Make sure the affected person immediately leaves or is taken from the water
    • Remove any remaining tentacles using a clean stick or, ideally, tweezers
    • Apply an ice pack to reduce swelling and pain
    • Use a razor blade or money card to remove any nematocysts that are stuck to the skin
    • Take ibuprofen or other painkillers to reduce effects of pain afterwards, as needed

    The NHS also lists a few things to avoid, and puts to bed a few old wives tales about how to treat jellyfish stings. These include:

    • Not urinating on the sting, it may do more harm than good
    • Refraining from using vinegar as, like urine, it may have adverse effects
    • Not treating the area with alcohol or baking soda
    • When travelling to places where jellyfish are common, do some research on areas of water that you should avoid before entering the sea.

    Accident Advice Helpline

    If you have been involved in an accident abroad, Accident Advice Helpline can help you recover the travel accident compensation you are entitled to.

    Speak with us today regarding your claim for travel accident compensation on freephone number, 0800 689 0500.

    Date Published: April 29, 2016

    Author: Accident Advice

    Accident Advice Helpline (or AAH) is a trading style of Slater Gordon Solutions Legal Limited. Slater Gordon Solutions Legal Limited is a company registered in England and Wales with registration number 07931918, VAT 142 8192 16, registered office Dempster Building, Atlantic Way, Brunswick Business Park, Liverpool, L3 4UU and is an approved Alternative Business Structure authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

    Disclaimer: This website contains content contributed by third parties, therefore any opinions, comments or other information expressed on this site that do not relate to the business of AAHDL or its associated companies should be understood as neither being held or endorsed by this business.

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