The Travellers Guide to Driving Etiquette

Get the lowdown on what you need to know when you're in the driving seat!

Did you know that you can get seven years in prison for running over a cow in India? If you're not aware of how driving etiquette differs by country your relaxing holiday can turn sour all too easily.

To ensure you have a stress-free driving experience abroad, we've created this guide. Included for your perusal are travel blogger tips, videos and road rule shockers that only the locals know about.

Choose a country below

Europe

  • France
  • Spain
  • Italy
  • Germany

Asia

  • Thailand
  • China
  • India
  • Qatar
  • Singapore

America

  • Chile
  • Mexico
  • Canada
  • USA

Australia

  • Australia

Africa

  • Egypt
  • Kenya
  • Morocco

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Driving in...

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Featured Travel Blogger Tip - India

"In India - and I say this tongue-in-cheek - remember that you have the right of way at all times, with the only exception where you might give up this right being when another vehicle is bigger than yours or when you encounter cows (which are sacred in India). Also, when driving, assume nothing and expect anything."

http://www.aluxurytravelblog.com/

Featured Video - India

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - India

"Driving in India demands the driver to be alert and responsive as pedestrians jaywalk while bikers cut lanes abruptly. You need to have complete focus on the other vehicles and drivers around with your outward mirror angled to give you a better view. Keep your car in top mechanical shape by checking the tire pressure and by not overloading it with excessive passengers and cargo which impacts the dynamics of the vehicle. Always wear seat-belts and choose daytime driving over night time."

https://indiadestinationsblog.wordpress.com

Do's

  • Do honk your horn almost continuously - drivers can sometimes honk theirs up to 150 times a day.
  • Do hover your foot over the brake pedal - you will need to emergency stop for nearly everything imaginable that might be crossing the road.
  • Do overtake often and mostly into oncoming traffic - when in Rome!
  • Do park up pretty much where you feel like it - smack bang in the middle of the road is probably not acceptable, but you get the jist.
  • Do accept responsibility in a crash if your vehicle is bigger than theirs, regardless of whose fault it is, it's the way they do it in India.

Don'ts

  • Do not be courteous to other drivers when on the road - it will get you nowhere!
  • Do not drive at night if you can help it - drivers in India often use their beam to almost blind oncoming traffic so they can have the right of way. They also rarely use their indicators at night and still they zig-zag across the roads as they please.
  • Contrary to a 'Do' point listed, do not honk your horn in designated quiet zones, these are normally around hospitals.
  • Do not, under any circumstance, rely on road markings or traffic signs; just remember, these are merely road decorations.

Shockers

  • Even though the road signs in India are purely for decoration purposes they will definitely give you a good laugh on your journey.
  • There are more road deaths in India than any other country in the world.
  • You can get up to 7 years in prison for hitting a cow with your car.

The Rules

  • The minimum age for driving in India is 18 - although many rental companies won't lease a car to anyone under the age of 23.
  • In India they drive on the left hand side of the road and the cars are a right hand drive.
  • The blood alcohol limit is 0.3% - the punishment for going over this is severe, you could be looking at up to 6 months in an Indian prison.
  • In terms of right of way, normally it lies with vehicles already proceeding on that road.
  • Speed limits in India vary but on average the limit for expressways is 100-120km/h and in town areas it's 50-70km/h.
  • Most petrol stations are open from 7am to 8pm and in major cities they can be open 24hours.
  • You must give free passage to fire service vehicles and ambulances.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Australia

"Australia has plenty of speed cameras, often without any signs to warn you of their presence. Always watch your speed or you'll be slapped with a hefty speeding ticket after you return home. Another reason to slow down? Kangaroos crossing the road in rural areas can be a serious danger and once hit they can easily write off your car."

http://kellyellamaz.com//

Featured Video - Australia

Do's

  • Wear your seatbelt. A fine of around $250 per unsecured driver and/or passenger will apply.
  • Rest often. Long, straight and deserted highways can make it easy to lose concentration otherwise. Remember: 'Stop, Revive, Survive'.
  • Beware of wandering animals. Kangaroos in particular will leap across roads directly in front of vehicles

Don'ts

  • Drink and drive. Police conduct random breath tests along major routes and back streets throughout the country.
  • Underestimate how long it takes to get from point A to point B. Australia is huge and takes time to get around.
  • Rely on your mobile to get you out of trouble in the outback. Large areas of Australia do not have service.

Shockers

  • Some states double their fines on the day before public holiday weekends due to the increased risk of accidents on these days.
  • In the Outback motorists may travel for hundreds of kilometres between opportunities to refuel, get water, grab refreshments or use toilets.

The Rules

  • The blood alcohol limit is 0.05% throughout Australia, but learner and provisional drivers are not permitted to have any alcohol in their system at all.
  • Australians drive on the left-hand side of the road and use the metric system of distances and speeds (km/h).
  • Drivers in Australia require a valid driver's licence, or you can drive with a foreign (English language) licence for three months.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Canada

"Traffic drives on the right hand side of the road, with overtaking on the left side. It is also illegal to drive while talking on a mobile phone, and never attempt to bribe a police officer out of writing you any kind of traffic violation ticket. If you are ever in doubt about who has right of way, it is safest to yield anyway and give it away. "

http://worldadventurists.com/

Featured Video - Canada

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Canada

"While driving in Canada, it is very important that if you see an emergency vehicle, such as a police car, ambulance or provincial police vehicle with a flashing light, to change lanes immediately to the side of the road or highway shoulder. This is called the Move Over Law or Corridor de Sécurité in French. Failing to do this may result in a heavy fine."

http://travellersoul76.com/

Do's

  • Check whether snow tires are required in the province you're driving in.
  • Beware of wildlife. They often get mesmerised by car lights and stand frozen in the path of your car, or can bolt across the road out of nowhere.
  • Come to a complete stop at the white line when you see a stop sign.

Don'ts

  • Attempt to bribe a police officer if you are stopped by one. This is a very serious crime in Canada.
  • Drink and drive. Driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) is a serious offense.
  • Ignore school buses. If one stops and flashes their lights red stop your car no matter which direction you are passing

Shockers

  • Canadian drivers run red lights with alarming regularity, so it is advised to hesitate and look before proceeding when traffic lights turn green.
  • Canada is a country that spans six time zones, so it can become difficult to keep track of time when driving long distances.
  • In Quebec, most of the signs are in French only, so in certain areas knowledge of French can be important.

The Rules

  • It is illegal to take car radar detectors into many Canadian territories, regardless of whether they are used or not.
  • The legal driving age can differ by province/territory. However, it's generally 17 to drive independently after obtaining a valid driver's licence.
  • In many Canadian provinces/territories, it is a legal requirement to switch on your headlights during the day to aid visibility.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Chile

"Consider renting a car and seeing the where road will take you when you travel to Chile. You wont regret it... One thing that didn't occur to me was getting tinted windows, a real shame as it was a battle trying to stay out of the Atacama Desert sun. "

http://wanderingtrader.com/

Featured Video - Chile

Do's

  • Be prepared for a range of driving conditions, from snow and ice to hot sandy deserts.
  • Use your horn. Drivers use their horn and indicators constantly to signal where they are turning or that they are passing another vehicle.
  • Be aggressive to get into another lane, or wait until all traffic passes by to enter. The concept of "merging" is entirely alien to Chilean drivers.

Don'ts

  • Smoke or listen to a personal music player with headphones whilst driving - it is illegal.
  • Forget to keep an eye out for cyclists and farm animals along the road.
  • Drive in the lanes indicated for buses and taxis, they are separated by a yellow median and may not be used by normal cars.

Shockers

  • There is no car insurance available on Easter Island. In the case of an accident or causing damage to your vehicle, you will have to pay for the repairs yourself.
  • Certain cars are restricted from driving in Santiago between 7.30am and 9pm.

The Rules

  • Seat belts are mandatory for all occupants of the vehicle.
  • Right-hand turns are generally prohibited at red lights unless otherwise indicated.
  • You can use your UK driving license while in Chile if you're visiting as a tourist, but you must have your passport and entrance card with you while driving.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - China

"It's easy to get a parking ticket in Hong Kong! Be warned that the only place you legally park on the streets are where there are meters. Just because there are no lines, doesn't mean you can park! "

http://jetlagandmayhem.com/

Featured Video - China

Do's

  • Merge. If you see an opening the oncoming traffic will yield and allow you to merge.
  • Skip red lights. If there is no oncoming traffic and no pedestrians then why the hell not!
  • Honk your horn whenever you feel the need - how else will you get pedestrians to get out of your way?

Don'ts

  • Run anyone over. Pedestrians often jaywalk so constantly be alert. It's not unusual for pedestrians to walk in the road and vehicles to park on the pavements.
  • You don't have to wear a seatbelt, although in case of an accident it might be a good idea to!
  • Be afraid when you see a police car - you can overtake them, you can speed past them and you can cut them off.

Shockers

  • China's roads have the highest death rates in the world. Every day, about 45,000 are injured and 680 people killed.
  • A military vehicle has the right to move in the wrong direction and skip a red light if it wants to.
  • The bicycle is the most popular mode of transport. In total, there are approximately 500 million bicycles in China.

The Rules

  • In mainland China people drive on the right-hand side of the road, but in Hong Kong and Macau they drive on the left.
  • At roundabouts in China, the vehicle that gets there first has priority - or if it is bigger, moves faster or has a specific purpose that gives it priority.
  • In China, gas stations are full service and you can inform an attendant how much you want to pay and they will fill your tank accordingly.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Egypt

"Whether you're hiring a car or getting a taxi, be warned, the motorways and major roads in Egypt actually have speed bumps - not something you want to discover when you're doing 70mph! "

http://totaltravelblog.co.uk/

Featured Video - Egypt

Do's

  • Wear your seatbelt. By law you must wear a seatbelt at all times, front and back.
  • Be careful of livestock. Not only do you have to deal with unruly cars but you can often see livestock and donkeys in the middle of the road.
  • Find a good map. Egypt is so vast that even the locals get lost.

Don'ts

  • Sign any documentation you don't understand if you are in an accident. Accidents are very common in Egypt, just stay with the vehicle and alert the police.
  • Abandon your vehicle if it breaks down in the desert - wait for another vehicle to pass.
  • Use a mobile phone while driving - it is prohibited with the exception of a hands-free system.

Shockers

  • Roads in the centre of the city can have up to 8 'lanes'. Although the lack of actual marked lanes is what makes driving in Egypt very difficult.
  • Local taxi drivers take a lot of risks and their vehicles are often very old with no working seat belts.

The Rules

  • Visitors need an international driving licence along with their home licence to drive.
  • Egyptians drive on the right-hand side of the road.
  • Visitors need to be at least 25 years old to hire a car in Egypt.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - France

"An uncanny knack for cornering on hairpin bends, overtaking on narrow mountain roads and lurching your vehicle away from steep roadside precipices will stand you in good stead for driving in the Alpes-Maritimes region of France. Or don't do as the locals do and don't trust your SatNav - postcodes aren't as specific as they are in England! "

http://atptravels.com/

Featured Video - France

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - France

"While Road Rage is a comparatively recent phenomenon in Britain, in France it feels as though it always been an integral part of learning to drive. Some of the compulsory hand signals might not appear in Le Code de la Route but they would certainly be immediately recognisable to anyone, regardless of nationality. "

http://www.thegoodlifefrance.com/

Do's

  • Use seatbelts. It is compulsory for front and rear occupants to wear seatbelts, if fitted.
  • Fill up for petrol at a hypermarket/superstore rather than on the autoroute. The fuel prices will be lower and the savings can be as much as 15 cents per litre.
  • Be aware that the drinking limit in France is 0.5mg as opposed to the 0.8 mg in the UK.

Don'ts

  • Use the horn unless it's absolutely necessary. In all built-up areas, use of the horn is prohibited except in cases of immediate danger.
  • Violate traffic regulations. Some French police authorities are authorised to impose and collect fines on the spot of up to €375 from drivers who do.
  • Use your mobile phone while driving. Drivers caught using mobile phones while on the road in France are liable to pay an on-the-spot fine of €130.

Shockers

  • It is compulsory for drivers of all motor vehicles and motorcycles (excluding mopeds) to carry a breathalyser in France.
  • It is prohibited for drivers to carry any devices such as a satnav or GPS that is capable of detecting speed cameras.

The Rules

  • With a few exceptions, children under the age of 10 are not allowed to travel on the front seats of vehicles without using a special child restraint.
  • It is important to note that when driving in wet conditions in France, the speed limits are lower.
  • When driving in France, you must bring a GB sticker to display in the rear windscreen of your vehicle and your motor insurance certificate.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - France

"Although some people think the French driving laws are bureaucracy gone mad, some of the items do offer you improved safety while on the road. "

http://www.drive-france.com/

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Germany

"Germany's Autobahn is one of the only places in the world where you can drive as fast as you want. Believe it or not, there are actually speed limits on certain routes of the Autobahn. The most famous stretches of the Autobahn are marked by a round sign with 5 diagonal stripes. Stretches without this sign are monitored regularly and lined with hidden cameras. "

http://blog.goeuro.co.uk/germany-autobahn/

Featured Video - Germany

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Germany

"What many visitors don't realize is that while driving in Germany can be exhilarating there are also a lot more rules that many drivers may be used to. Many of the signs will be recognized by European drivers who also have similar signs, but coming from Canada, a lot of these were new to me. "

http://monkeysandmountains.com/

Do's

  • Flash your headlights and honk your horn, but only when you are alerting other cars to an accident or need to overtake.
  • Give way to traffic that is already on the roundabout.
  • Always give way to emergency service vehicles, regardless of whether there is an audible warning signal or not

Don'ts

  • Indicate when entering a roundabout. You must, however, use your indicators before leaving the roundabout.
  • Drink and drive. Germany has strict drink driving laws, only allowing 0.5 milligrams of alcohol per millilitre of blood - stricter than the UK where the limit is 0.8.
  • Allow children under the age of 3 to sit in the front seat of a vehicle - it is against the law.

Shockers

  • In Germany, parking your vehicle is defined as leaving it unattended for more than three minutes.
  • You can avoid trucks on the autobahn; there is a 24-hour ban from midnight each Saturday until Sunday evening.

The Rules

  • The speed limit for an autobahn is 130 km/h; Highways are 100 km/h; and built up areas are 50km/h.
  • Germans drive on the right-hand side of the road.
  • The symbols for road signs in Germany are generally the same as their UK equivalents.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Italy

"If someone flashes their car headlights at you in Italy be careful - they're telling you to get out of their way. If you come across a stream of cars enthusiastically and constantly sounding their horns in Italy it's likely to be for one of two reasons. It will either be the wedding guests driving from the ceremony to the reception (they'll probably have some white ribbon tied to the car aerial too) or it will be football fans celebrating their team winning an important match. When driving in Italy make sure that you have a red warning triangle and visibility vests for you and your passengers in case you break down - you could be liable for a fine if you don't have them. "

www.mumsdotravel.com

Featured Video - Italy

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Italy

"When you drive in Italy always check on your right side, because a lot of scooters overtake on that side! "

www.ViaggiaredaSoli.net

Do's

  • Bring a licence issued by any EU country, as you do not require an international driving permit.
  • Keep right and overtake on the left.
  • Use seatbelts in the front and rear seats. Failure to keep them fastened may result in fines for both drivers and passengers.

Don'ts

  • Expect people to slow down for you or let you out. As soon as you see a gap, go for it.
  • Don't speed. There are cameras on some roads and motorways, if caught you could get speeding a fine of over €100.
  • Drink more than one glass of wine, as you could risk going over the limit. Penalties for being caught above the limit range from fines to imprisonment.

Shockers

  • Lane hopping and late braking are the norm on Italian motorways, and it's not uncommon to see cars tailgating at 130km/h.

The Rules

  • Hefty on-the-spot fines can be issued for failing to carry specific items: reflective jackets, a warning triangle and headlamp beam deflectors.
  • Overtaking is forbidden on the approach to and on level crossings, at bends, on the brow of a hill, at intersections and all places where visibility is limited.
  • Mopeds and motorcycles can be confiscated for 3 months because of failure to wear a safety helmet and carrying an unauthorised passenger (specified in certificate).

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Kenya

"Don't expect any etiquette or manners on the road. All those cheerful smiles in the supermarket do not belong on the roads. You need to be swift with the wheel and fast on the pedal. No hesitation or waiting time. Every man or woman for him/herself on the Kenyan roads. "

http://mombasamoods.blogspot.co.uk/

Featured Video - Kenya

Do's

  • Use the Mombasa road between Jomo Kenyatta Airport (JKIA) and Nairobi city. There have been incidents of car-jacking on the old airport road (Airport South Road) and Jogoo Road.
  • Before you arrive in Kenya, let the rental company know if you're planning a self-drive safari to avoid any surprises.
  • Avoid driving at night wherever possible, as Kenya's roads become more dangerous after the sun has set.

Don'ts

  • Carry large amounts of cash and don't wear expensive watches, jewellery or items of sentimental value as there are incidents of car-jacking in Kenya.
  • Forget to carry your driving licence with you, as you will be stopped frequently by curious and bored police. If you fail to produce a licence, you will be fined.
  • Don't expect any etiquette or manners on the road. In Kenya, it's every man or woman for him or herself when behind the wheel.

Shockers

  • During the rainy season some roads will become impassable. Therefore, you should check with locals on the state of the roads before setting off.
  • On the spot fines are common, but not legal. If a police officer stops and fines you, ask for a 'receipt for cash bond' telling you how to meet the charge against you.

The Rules

  • You can drive for up to 3 months using a UK driving licence. For longer stays, you'll need to get a Kenyan driving licence.
  • The legal driving age in Kenya is 18 years old.
  • Exceeding the speed limit by 20 km/h or more results in a minimum fine of $240 and/or as much as three years in prison.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Mexico

" When driving in Baja, Mexico, it's best to only travel during the daytime due to roaming cattle and bandits. "

http://beersandbeans.com/

Featured Video - Mexico

Do's

  • Pay attention to landslides or - in the mountains - falling rocks in the rainy season.
  • Be aware that it's common to find potholes, drop-offs, dirt roads, and other hazards once you are off the main highways.
  • Use Green Angels [Ángeles Verdes] if your vehicle breaks down. They are a free service who patrols the highways looking for people in need of help.

Don'ts

  • Drive quickly over steep bumps known as 'topes'. In fact, you should drive extremely slowly or almost stop your vehicle to get over 'topes'.
  • Drive at night, unless you can't avoid it. Mexico's roads become more dangerous from dusk until dawn.
  • Don't get in the way of Mexican semi-trucks ("camiones") as they drive fast and furiously, while taking up as much of the road as they possibly can.

Shockers

  • Two lane highways with shoulders are used as four lane highways. Oncoming vehicles will pass and expect you to move onto the shoulder.
  • The culture of "mordida" (the term for bribe in the local slang) still prevails, so Federales may be willing to let you go with a friendly warning in exchange for money.

The Rules

  • Foreigners driving into Mexico beyond the 'Free Zone' are allowed to bring their vehicles into the country as long as they meet certain documentary requirements.
  • Mexicans drive on the right-hand side of the road.
  • Drivers without insurance that are at fault for an accident that causes personal injuries or damage to the roadways will go to jail.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Morocco

"There seems to be a blatant disregard for any traffic laws in Morocco. Painted lines on the road mean nothing and drivers do not "stick to their own lanes". What would normally be a two lane road back home is now 6 lanes of honking cars. You should also be aware that it's very common for someone to make a left hand turn from the far right lane, dangerously cutting off everyone else. As long as the driver honks this seems to be generally accepted. "

http://kellyellamaz.com/

Featured Video - Morocco

Do's

  • Slow down and look sideways before you pass a green light. Sometimes, people ignore traffic lights when there are not many cars around.
  • Communicate with other drives and pedestrians with exaggerated gestures, eye contact and a healthy honk of your horn.
  • Learn to tell the difference between "get out of my way" and "you can go ahead" signals from other drivers. A quick flash of high beam lights can mean both, depending on the context.

Don'ts

  • Go over the speed limit, even going over 5km/h can earn a speeding ticket that'll cost you 400DH.
  • Don't forget to use gestures to say "sorry" or "thanks." This will really help you go a long way in enjoying life when driving in Morocco.
  • Don't use mobile phones while driving - it is illegal in Morocco.

Shockers

  • You should avoid driving at night as many of the 'obstacles' on the road will not have lights and there are also mountain roads which do not have guard rails.
  • Hitch-hiking is very common in Morocco. However, there are several scams in place, so it is discouraged to take any hitch-hikers.

The Rules

  • By law you should keep your headlights on during the day as well as at night.
  • Seatbelts are mandatory for all drivers and all passengers, whether they are sitting in the front or the back seats.
  • Because Morocco is a Muslim country there is a zero tolerance policy to driving if you have been drinking. Do not consider it unless you are willing to do time in a Moroccan jail.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Qatar

"Roads are in a good condition but driving skills of locals are not always the same as you might be used to at home. Drive defensively. "

http://www.travellerspoint.com/guide/Qatar/

Featured Video - Qatar

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Qatar

"For my own safety I use my horn to remind drivers that, well, I'm here and can't dematerialise to nothingness. "

http://thegulfblog.com/

Do's

  • Watch out for camels crossing the road.
  • Move over when a car behind you flashes their lights, as they will probably just bump you off the road.
  • Just go for it at a roundabout, as drivers often ignore road etiquette and fail to give way when they should.

Don'ts

  • Do not lose your temper and do not use bad language, hand gestures or any other signs of aggressive behaviour.
  • Drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs, the sanctions in Qatar are very severe.
  • Honk your horn to express frustration or anger. The horn should only be used to warn other drivers of heavy traffic, collisions etc.

Shockers

  • Qatari drivers in their SUVs cruise over sand dunes as a sport and they do so with great passion and enthusiasm.
  • Most cars in Qatar are painted white. This is because white is the easiest and cheapest colour to buff out scratches caused by minor collisions.
  • Most Qatari drivers let their babies and toddlers sit on the laps of other passengers as they drive along.

The Rules

  • Drive on the right-hand side of the road.
  • The minimum legal age for driving a car in Qatar is 18 years old.
  • It is illegal to use a mobile phone while driving.
  • Drink driving is strictly prohibited; there is a zero-tolerance policy on alcohol levels.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Singapore

" Singapore is one of the easiest places to drive in the world! British driving rules were adopted in colonial times and have stuck ever since, so everyone drives on the left. But the main reason it's so easy to drive there, is due to the Electronic Road Pricing system, which is a scheme put in place to deter congestion. Since they implemented this system the city centre roads are traffic free, and with only a handful of cars on the road it's pretty easy to navigate through town! "

www.enjoythejourney.org.uk

Featured Video - Singapore

Do's

  • Overtake when necessary, but only in the right-hand lane.
  • Allow pedestrians to cross at their leisure at zebra crossings.
  • Expect the unexpected. In Singapore, there are many cars parked along the streets, and you will need to be ready for someone to step onto the road from between them.

Don'ts

  • Use a mobile phone while driving - this is against the law.
  • Do not honk your horn to express frustration - save it only for serious warnings.
  • Hog the road - this is an offence, keep to the left.

Shockers

  • Singapore has the sixth highest vehicle density - however, the fatality risk is lower than the UK.
  • Motorcyclists make up only 17% of the motor vehicles, but are accountable for 48% of all fatalities.

The Rules

  • In Singapore, you drive on the left-side of the road.
  • Seat belts and child seats are mandatory.
  • Head lights must be turned on between 7 pm and 7 am.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Spain

" Work this one out. In some Spanish cities, which side of the road you park on can be dictated by the day of the week. And, on some one way streets, you can only park on the side of the road where the house numbers are even, if the day of the month is an even number. Day of the month an odd number? ... yep, you guessed it, park your motor on the side of the street without uneven house numbers. "

www.backpacksandbunkbeds.co.uk

Featured Video - Spain

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Spain

" In Ibiza you can find almost anything on the road. Bicycles, people that walk, joggers and if you are lucky you need to stop for sheep! "

www.ibizainside.com

Do's

  • Be aware of radar speed traps, they are very common and the fines which must be paid on the spot in cash can be heavy.
  • Unless signed otherwise, give way to traffic already on a roundabout on your left.
  • Carry your photo driving licence, vehicle registration document (V5), and certificate of motor insurance at all times.

Don'ts

  • Drink and drive. If you are over the blood alcohol limit of 0.05% you could face anything from a severe fine, withdrawal of your licence or even possible prison time.
  • Use the left fast lane on motorways if you are not going fast or overtaking another car. Use the right or middle lane, or risk angering local drivers.
  • Do not use a mobile phone while driving, unless you have a hands free kit. The Guardia Civil has fined many motorists for using their cell phones.

Shockers

  • At street side parking in many cities, there are "gorillas" (men who ask you for a contribution to watch your car). Keep small change in your car for these men, or something bad might happen to your car.
  • Spanish roads are notorious for not having many signs announcing coming shopping malls or tourist attractions.

The Rules

  • The use of radar detectors is not permitted.
  • Pets must be restrained in a moving car at all times.
  • Headlights must always be used in tunnels. There will be a sign before the tunnel alerting you to put on your lights and one after the tunnel to turn them off again.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Thailand

"Unfortunately, in Thailand, no such order exists when you are on the road. As you navigate the roads you will be confronted with motorcycles, cars and people coming at you from all directions. "

http://www.intophuket.com/

Featured Video - Thailand

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - Thailand

"A common rule of thumb for driving in Thailand is that if a vehicle is bigger than yours it has the right of way. You'll need to give way to anything on the road that is larger than your vehicle. Trucks, pickup trucks, cars and scooters have right of way in that order. "

http://flashpackerfamily.com/

Do's

  • Flash your headlights to warn another vehicle to get out of your way.
  • Be careful of 'things' crossing the road. Just about anything or anyone can cross the road at any time; dogs, cows, snakes, but also pedestrians and children, even on highways.
  • Be aware that many roads change their one-way direction at certain hours of the day.

Don'ts

  • Honk your horn, as the locals hardly ever honk their horn and anger is never displayed.
  • Drive at night, unless you can help it. Many local cars have broken light and buses like to race one another dangerously just to stay awake.
  • You don't have to wear a seat belt if you're travelling in the back of the car, although you might be advised to still do so.

Shockers

  • In Thailand, just a few years ago, it was possible to purchase a driving licence without passing any test whatsoever.
  • A frequently-used method of warning road users of a breakdown in the road ahead is to cover the road with tree branches.
  • People will honk continuously when passing by a temple or a sacred place. There was a time when Thai people would let go of the wheel, join hands and "wai"!

The Rules

  • Drive on the left side of the road.
  • Roundabouts are not common in Thailand, as deadly U-turns are favoured instead.
  • Drivers of larger vehicles may assume that smaller vehicles will give way.
  • Speed limit in towns: 60km/h, highways: 90-100 km/h and motorways: 120km/h.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - USA

"1. On Rancho California Road in Temecula, California - it isn't the driver who has the right of way. But Ducks! The reason is because there is a fairly large Duck pond nearby. What else? 2. I've never been here, but a close friend says in Kansas that if you screech your tyres (even if it isn't your fault) then you're looking at a minimum of 30-days in jail. So make sure you're wheels aren't too "squeaky clean". 3. In a small town in Rhode Island; you'll get fined if there are cans of beer in your car. Regardless of whether they are open or not. On the bright side, walking down the street with a pack of cans is good exercise... "

www.travelwithben.com

Featured Video - USA

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - USA

"Make sure you do a little homework on the state you are driving on, as each one is a little bit different. For instance, right hand turns on red are illegal in New York City, but legal in CA. Make sure to download a handy driving app such as Google Maps or Waze to ensure a smooth ride. Also, always wear your seat belt! "

http://jetsetera.net/

Do's

  • Drive defensively. Always be aware of nearby vehicles and anticipate, wherever possible, the movements of other drivers.
  • Stop for pedestrians on a crosswalk. Crosswalks are implied at four-way intersections. In most states, you must stop for any pedestrian who steps out anywhere in the road.
  • Plan your journey and know your next turn. Although roads are generally well marked, heavy traffic conditions on multiple-lane roads can make advanced movements essential.

Don'ts

  • Drive in bike lanes. However, parking within a bike lane is permitted in some areas.
  • Block intersections (with or without traffic lights) when traffic backs up. This is called "blocking the box" and if there is a police officer around, you will get a ticket because it can cause gridlock.
  • Do not use "flash to pass" or other headlight signalling. It may be viewed as road rage by other drivers, or worse, it may incite road rage in other drivers.

Shockers

  • Most gasoline stations require you to pay before filling up - even if no sign is displayed telling you to do so.
  • Making right turns on red signals after stopping is allowed in most states, unless otherwise signposted or the traffic lights show a red arrow in place of the standard red light.

The Rules

  • Driving laws are set by each state and rules and speed limits may differ slightly when traveling across state borders.
  • When a school bus has stopped for passengers, a sign will swing out from the side of the bus, or flashing lights will be activated, and it is illegal to pass the bus in either direction.
  • You must park along the right side of the road at all times - going with the traffic, not against it.

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - USA

"One of the most suprising rules you may encounter if you live outside North America, is that in all states you can make a right turn at a red stop light, unless otherwise indicated, with the exception being part of NYC. Treat a red light as a stop sign and stop before making a right turn, as there will still be oncoming traffic coming from your left. "

http://worldadventurists.com/

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - USA

"Have a GPS as those busy roads can be tricky to navigate, remember you can turn right on a red light (but pedestrians have right of way) and remember your car registration plate as there are a lot of red Mustangs and you don't want to lose your hire car like I did! . "

http://littletravelbee.com/

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - USA

"A red light means stop, right? Well, not exactly. When driving in the USA remember that unless there are signs stating otherwise, you are expected to take a right turn at red light if it is safe. "

http://girlinlondon.com/

Featured Travel Blogger Tip - USA

"Be sure to check the laws regarding driving and using your mobile phone in the state you're visiting. Most states have laws prohibiting texting while driving, but regardless of the laws its safer to never text and drive! "

www.onthegoblogger.com/

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Disclaimer: The featured travel blogger tips are the words and recommendations of each individual blogger. The videos used were not created by Accident Advice Helpline.